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POP-Corn presents: Koyaanisqatsi + Q&A w/ Bob Gilbert

Koyaanisqatsi, film screening, Poplar Union, East London, free film screening, environment, POP-Corn presents, January, things to do, free event, free
Koyaanisqatsi, film screening, Poplar Union, East London, free film screening, environment, POP-Corn presents, January, things to do, free event, free

See nature battle technology in arguably one of Hayao Miyazake’s greatest films, which contrasts the tranquil beauty of nature with the frenzied hum of contemporary urban society. Followed by a Q&A with local author and writer of Ghost Trees, charting the history of Poplar through the generations of trees discovered here.

About the film

Prepare to experience a truly remarkable film. Koyaanisqatsi is a cinematic masterpiece so extraordinary that it regales the senses, stimulates the mind and actually “redefines the potential of filmmaking” (The Hollywood Reporter).

Celebrated director Godfrey Reggio, innovative cinematographer Ron Fricke and Golden Globe-winning composer Philip Glass have created a “spellbinding [film] so rich in beauty and detail that with each viewing it becomes a new and different film” (Leonard Maltin).

“Unique profound mesmerising and thought-provoking” (Boxoffice), Koyaanisqatsi contrasts the tranquil beauty of nature with the frenzied hum of contemporary urban society. Uniting breath-taking imagery with a hauntingly evocative, award-winning score, it is original and fascinating (People) one of the greatest films of all time (Uncut).

Q&A

To follow the screening, there will be a Q&A with local author and writer of Ghost Trees, Bob Gilbert. Written in part in the Poplar Union café, e5 Roasthouse, Ghost Trees begins as a chronicle and a celebration of wildlife in the inner city and goes on to tell the story of the Poplar area through the generations of trees that have inhabited it. It moves from the black poplars of the Thames-side marshland, that gave the area its name, through the eras of cultivation and development, of orchards, mulberry plantations and the generations of street trees, and on to the trees of a futuristic urban woodland: the ‘post-human tree’.

Above all it is a reflection on our relationship with the trees, and the other wildlife, with which we share our space, and on the lingering impact of even those that have gone: the ‘ghost trees’ of the title. Its aim is to bring together natural history, local history and community in a celebration of the importance of place.

Fri 18 January 7.30pm-9pm

Free
Age range: cert. U

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